Sex Professionals Unite, and Alina Adams is up for an award.

    
       
          All professions have various associations, clubs, and special interest groups. Some of them lobby for legislation, such as "California Professional Firefighters," or "The International Union of Professional Sex Workers" Yes, sex service professionals are entitled to  safe working conditions, and collective bargaining doesn’t just refer to 3-ways anymore.

I’m not a firefighter, and writing tie-in novels is not the prostitution of art and literature.  I belong to International Association of Media Tie-In Writers and as of right now, the books submitted for consideration in the Tie-In Writers Awards for the Category of GENERAL FICTION/BEST NOVEL (original) are:


LAS VEGAS: HIGH STAKES by Jeff Mariotte
MR. MONK GOES TO HAWAII by Lee Goldberg
MURDER SHE WROTE: THREE STRIKES AND YOU’RE DEAD by Donald Bain
GUNSMOKE: THE RECKLESS GUN by Joseph A. West
CSI: SNAKE EYES by Max Allan Collins
OAKDALE CONFIDENTIAL: SECRETS REVEALED by Alina Adams
ALIAS: NAMESAKES by Greg Cox
CSI NY: BLOOD ON THE SUN by Stuart Kaminsky

Alina Adams, author of Oakdale Confidential,  recently posted these comments on the official tie-in writers blog:

Whenever I see the above list, I am tempted to regress to Sesame Street
age (it’s not that hard, I have three small children, at any given
point in any given day, someone is screaming that they want to watch
it) and hum, "One of these kids doesn’t belong here/One of these kids
isn’t the same."

The kid in question would be me.  Alina Adams, author of "Oakdale
Confidential." Because, while all of the other titles are tie-ins to
shows that feature stand-alone episodes with beginnings, middles and
ends, mine came from the soap opera, "As The World Turns," a genre
where a story actually coming to an end would mean, well, the end.

In that respect, all of the stories featured in the other tie-in novels could have conceivably happened in between the characters’ other adventures.  My characters have no in-betweens.
They’re on five days a week (sure, maybe my story could have been
squeezed in on that rare weekend off, but it’s kind of doubtful).

In addition, even the longest running show on the list, "Gunsmoke,"
only ran twenty years. "As The World Turns" celebrated fifty years on
the air last April. (Hence, my use of the word "only" prior to "twenty
years.") Even if the writers had been so motivated, they would have had
"only twenty years," at most, of history to summarize. I had fifty. And
some of my under 25 year old characters have already been married three
times. Not to mention come back from the dead once or twice.

Finally,
all of the other books carry bylines of real people. Even "Murder, She
Wrote" is credited to Jessica Fletcher (not a real person) and Donald Bain (presumably a real person — we’ve never met).  Mine is credited to Katie Peretti
(not a real person) WITH Alina Adams (I like to think I’m real but, as
stated below, I have three children, so altered states of sleep
deprived reality are not out of the question).

So, one of these kids isn’t the same… But I’m still thrilled to have been allowed to join in the fun.

Fun?
Yes!
Writers have fun writing, even when the fun is torturous.
As the madame said to her employees in Wild Orchid Two, "If you are doing something you don’t enjoy, become someone who enjoys it."

2 Responses to “Sex Professionals Unite, and Alina Adams is up for an award.”

  1. Mike Hobart

    The tie-in market has certainly boomed. In recent years I had expected it to dwindle away, since in my younger pre-video days the paperback novelization was the only tangible souvenir one could keep of a favorite movie or televison show. With the rise of home-taping and boxed sets of DVDs, I thought this might change. Apparently not!
    Of course it’s always a factor that some novelizations are better than the original — one remembers “Space 1999” in which the novels were written by top British SF writers, unlike the television scripts.
    And of course I much prefer the novel of “The Saint” to the movie!

    Reply
  2. Mike Hobart

    The tie-in market has certainly boomed. In recent years I had expected it to dwindle away, since in my younger pre-video days the paperback novelization was the only tangible souvenir one could keep of a favorite movie or televison show. With the rise of home-taping and boxed sets of DVDs, I thought this might change. Apparently not!
    Of course it’s always a factor that some novelizations are better than the original — one remembers “Space 1999” in which the novels were written by top British SF writers, unlike the television scripts.
    And of course I much prefer the novel of “The Saint” to the movie!

    Reply

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